Previous Seminars

Objective mapping of oceanographic sections

Speaker: 
Florian Geyer
Seminar Date: 
5. December 2013 - 12:30 - 13:00

Objective mapping is a method for the statistical interpolation of co-varying data sets. For the ACOBAR experiment in Fram Strait objective mapping was used for constructing a smooth sound-speed field from CTD sections. The seminar will shortly present the theory of objective mapping and then concentrate on the practical implementation for the example of a CTD section.

NOAA's new and improved Extended Reconstruction Sea Surface Temperature product: What is new and how is it improved?

Speaker: 
Peter Thorne
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
28. November 2013 - 12:30 - 13:00

Over the past 18 months NOAA's National Climatic Data Center have been revising and re-evaluating their historical SST product. The new product included the evaluation of many existing and new methodological choices as to how to analyse the data drawing upon, amongst others, improved holdings of SST raw data and improved knowledge of available Night Marine Air Temperature holdings. The revised operational product is distinct from the preceding product in terms of multi-decadal global SST evolution, early period ENSO behaviour, and long-term SST behaviour in high latitudes.

Remote Sensing Time Series Observations of Great Lakes Water Quality Parameters

Speaker: 
Robert Shuchman
Affiliation: 
Co-Director Michigan Tech Research Institute (MTRI) Ann Arbor
Seminar Date: 
21. November 2013 - 13:15 - 14:00

Remote sensing provides a method to accurately assess water quality for current and historical conditions in large lakes such as the Laurentian Great Lakes. Satellite sensors such as Nimbus- CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS and VIIRS collect data that span large geographic areas and have been in operation for more than a decade, with some satellite programs that have existed since the late 1970s.

Nansen Guest Lecture - TBC

Speaker: 
Roberts A. Shuchman
Affiliation: 
Michigan Tech Research Institute Ann Arbor, Michigan, US
Seminar Date: 
21. November 2013 - 13:15 - 14:00

Assimilation of HF radar currents into a coastal ocean model: preliminary experiments with a simple quasi-geostrophic model

Speaker: 
Solène Jousset
Affiliation: 
Ifremer, Brest, France
Seminar Date: 
14. November 2013 - 12:30 - 13:00

Surface currents estimated by High Frequency (HF) radar are very repetitive and easily available observations of the coastal ocean. There is a five year long archive of HF radar currents acquired in the Iroise Sea (off the coast of French Brittany). Extremely interesting oceanographic processes take place in this area, such as strong thermal fronts. The main goal of the PhD is to lead a study on HF radar currents assimilation into numerical models and to examine the controllability of the local hydrology (especially that of the thermal front) using observations.

High-resolution regional climate studies with a turbulence-resolving model

Speaker: 
Igor Esau
Affiliation: 
GC Rieber Climate Institute
Seminar Date: 
7. November 2013 - 12:15 - 13:00

The meteorological observational network is typically too sparse to resolve important features of micro-climate. To some degree, the sparsity of observations is compensated by smoothness of the meteorological fields, which are slowly vary over tens and hundreds of kilometers. The meteorological fields over a complex, heterogeneous terrain, such as Western Norway, are not smooth. Their spatial and to partially temporal variability is controlled by the specific surface geometry and the response of the planetary boundary layer turbulence.

Weakening AMOC connects Equatorial Atlantic and Pacific interannual variability

Speaker: 
Lea Svendsen
Seminar Date: 
31. October 2013 - 12:30 - 13:00

Observations indicate that since the 1970's Equatorial Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) variations in boreal summer tend to modulate El Niño in the following seasons, indicating that the Atlantic Ocean can have importance for predicting the El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The cause of the change in the recent decades remains unknown.

NABOS 2013 expedition (personal impressions, observations, some preliminary results)

Speaker: 
Tobias Wolf
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
24. October 2013 - 12:00 - 12:30

The EnOI Ocean data assimilation system and its application: Perspectives from the South China Sea Warm Current in winter

Speaker: 
Jiping Xie
Affiliation: 
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, CAS, Beijing, China
Seminar Date: 
16. October 2013 - 12:15 - 13:00

The seas around China consist of the South China Sea (SCS), the East Sea, the Yellow sea and the Bohai Sea. Due to the influences of the Asian monsoon, Kuroshio intrusion, diverse topography, and tides, the upper-layer circulations in the seas is complex. The circulation is analyzed using a nested and high-resolution model of HYCOM including tides. The model represents well the mesoscale eddy actives in the marginal seas. However due to inaccuracy in atmosphere forcing,,model parameterization and lateral boundary condition, inaccuracy in the position of the mesoscale processes is inevitable.

Lagrangian pathways and transformation of Denmark Strait Overflow Water in the Irminger Basin

Speaker: 
Inga Monika Koszalka
Affiliation: 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and T. W. N. Haine and M. G. Magaldi
Seminar Date: 
10. October 2013 - 11:15 - 12:00

The Denmark Strait Overflow (DSO) supplies one third of the North Atlantic Deep Water and is a key component of the global thermohaline circulation. Knowledge of the pathways of DSO through the Irminger Basin and its transformation there is still incomplete however.