Previous Seminars

Courses in Geostatistics (3 days)

Speaker: 
Hans Wackernagel
Affiliation: 
Ecole des Mines de Paris, ParisTech
Seminar Date: 
9. January 2017 - 9:00 - 13. January 2017 - 15:00

Basics of Geostatistics from exploratory data analysis to kriging and conditional Monte Carlo simulations. It will take place on Monday 9th, Tuesday 10th and Friday 13th (brrr) January 2017.

Morning session 9-12: seminars
Afternoon session 13-16: Practical lab.

During the course we will use R together with the graphical interface RStudio and the geostatistics package RGeostats.
So, please bring your laptop with you and install before the course:

- the latest version of the software R: http://www.r-project.org/
- the graphical interface RStudio: http://www.rstudio.com

Scientific Platform as a Service - tools and solutions for efficient access to and analysis of oceanographic data at NERSC

Speaker: 
Morten W. Hansen
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
20. December 2016 - 12:30 - 13:00

The Effects of Model Error on the Ensemble Kalman Filter for the Linear Shallow Water Equations

Speaker: 
Colin Guider
Affiliation: 
PhD student at University of North Carolina
Seminar Date: 
16. November 2016 - 12:30 - 13:00

We consider the motion of a drifter in a flow field governed by the Linear Shallow Water Equations. The true trajectory of this drifter is affected by its mass. We introduce this an inertial parameter and study the resulting dynamical system. Further, assuming this drifter is a passive ocean instrument giving Lagrangian measurements, we give preliminary results on the efficacy of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF). We consider the case when the data assimilation algorithm assumes a massless drifter, and the case when the algorithm takes the inertia into account.

New developments in data assimilation in MIKE 21/3

Speaker: 
Jesper Mariegaard
Affiliation: 
DHI Group, Dk
Seminar Date: 
8. November 2016 - 11:15 - 11:45

DHIs marine 2d and 3d models MIKE 21/3 are capable of modelling flow and physical processes like sand transport, bacterial plumes, oil spill etc. A data assimilation module for MIKE 21/3 has been developed 10 years ago and developments have been sparse since then, but recently it has been given new life and a lot of attention in the FP7-LOTUS project and NordForsk EmblA Center of Excellence. The new developments include parallelization with MPI, assimilation of track data (e.g. satellite altimetry), Ensemble OI and localization in space and time.

Amplified Arctic Warming and Mid-latitude Weather : Emerging Connections

Speaker: 
Prof. Jennifer Francis
Affiliation: 
Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA
Seminar Date: 
4. October 2016 - 11:15 - 12:00

In this presentation I will discuss recent research illuminating the various seasonal and regional mechanisms by which the rapid warming of high northern latitudes may be affecting weather patterns in mid-latitudes, including extreme events. While studies based on both observations and model simulations have made progress in identifying these linkages, questions remain as to the relative importance of amplified Arctic warming and other factors from lower latitudes, as well as the state dependence of these influences. New metrics are opening windows to understanding this complex topic.

Ocean Acoustic Tomography in Fram Strait: Past Paths and Future Directions

Speaker: 
Brian Dushaw
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
29. September 2016 - 12:30 - 13:15

This talk will provide a brief review of the four recent publications listed below, and then conclude with some comments and speculations on some possible future directions.

Brian D. Dushaw, Hanne Sagen and Agnieszka Beszczynska-Möller, Sound speed as a proxy variable to temperature in Fram Strait, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 140, 622-630 (2016).
http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4959000

Calibration and performance of the GlobCurrent combined current using triple collocation

Speaker: 
Rick Danielson
Seminar Date: 
15. June 2016 - 15:30 - 16:30

As compared to the analysis of many common geophysical variables, the ocean surface current is a relatively new and unfamiliar challenge. A number of initiatives seek to improve the exploitation of satellite observations and provide more accurate historical and near real time information. In parallel, a synopsis of the performance of retrievals and analyses, based on the method called triple collocation, is also available following Stoffelen (1998) and McColl et al. (2014).

Google Earth Engine: easy way to work with satellite data in the Google cloud

Speaker: 
Anton Korosov
Seminar Date: 
2. June 2016 - 13:00 - 13:45

Google Earth Engine: 'A planetary-scale platform for Earth science data & analysis'
Interactive presentation of simple access to visualization and effective processing of vast satellite data. Seminar is for researches from any field and IT personnel who want to analyse satellite data, but don't want to bother with data download, software installation and development. Based on experience from the course, Google gave at ESA Living Planet Symposium in Prague.

Lessons learned from the neXtSIM-F forecasting platform

Speaker: 
Philipp Griewank
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
31. May 2016 - 14:15 - 15:00

In this talk I'll give an overview over the strengths and weaknesses of the neXtSIM-F forecasting platform I set up during my 2-year postdoc at NERSC. The talk will begin with a description of the model setup and assimilation method used which evaluated through hind casts, and the presentation will finish with an evaluation of the forecasts performed from 2015-11 to 2016-04.

Global glacier mass change and its causes on the centennial time scale

Speaker: 
Ben Marzeion
Affiliation: 
Institut für Geographie, Universität Bremen, Germany
Seminar Date: 
13. May 2016 - 10:15 - 11:00

Melting glaciers were likely the dominant cause of sea-level rise during the 20th century. Currently, glaciers are contributing about as much to sea-level rise as the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets combined, and also about as much as thermal expansion. During the 21st century, the relative contribution of glaciers is going to decrease, but they will remain an important part of the sea level budget also within the 22nd and 23rd centuries. I will discuss methods of reconstructing and projecting global glacier mass change, and present their results.