Seminar

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Weekly Lunch Seminars / Thursday Seminars - an open seminar for all

Influence of Madagascar Ridge on ocean mesoscale eddies in a regional ocean model

Speaker: 
Issufo Halo
Affiliation: 
1) Department of Conservation and Marine Sciences, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa, 8000 2) Nansen-Tutu Centre for Marine Environmental Research, Oceanography Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa, 7700
Seminar Date: 
5. April 2017 - 13:00 - 13:30

The topography of the world's ocean basins are among the least studied oceanographic environments. However, they are fundamental for understanding the oceanic circulation. In this study the role of the Madagascar Ridge on modulating the mesoscale circulation, more specifically the eddy field is being investigated using two climatological solutions derived from a regional ocean model, ROMS. In the first experiment the model runs with an ordinary GEBCO-01 topography, whereas in the second, it runs with a modified topography, where the Madagascar Ridge has been removed.

Wave-ice interactions in the neXtSIM sea-ice model

Speaker: 
Timothy Williams
Affiliation: 
NERSC
Seminar Date: 
27. April 2017 - 12:30 - 13:00

We have added a waves-in-ice model (WIM) into the new sea ice model neXtSIM. The physical effects included so far are the effect of the wave radiation stress (WRS) on the ice drift. Specifically, as waves travel into the ice, they are attenuated and lose momentum. This momentum could go into the ocean or the ice (or the atmosphere), but we transfer it entirely to the ice. The WRS, which is the flux of momentum from the waves to the ice, is relatively high at the ice edge but decays exponentially into the ice (like the wave energy).

Decadal Changes in Salinity in the Oceanic Subtropical Gyres

Speaker: 
Subrahmanyam (Subra) Bulusu
Affiliation: 
Satellite Oceanography Laboratory,School of the Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of South Carolina
Seminar Date: 
19. April 2017 - 11:00 - 12:00

There is evidence that the global water cycle has been undergoing an intensification over several decades as a response to increasing atmospheric temperatures, particularly in regions with skewed evaporation – precipitation (E-P) patterns such as the oceanic subtropical gyres. Moreover, observational data (rain gauges, etc.) are quite sparse over such areas due to the inaccessibility of open ocean regions. We analyzed spatial and temporal salinity trends in five subtropical gyre regions over the past six decades using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) reanalysis.

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