Internal seminar

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Bi-weekly Tuesday NERSC Internal seminars

Using a regional ocean model to understand the structure and sampling variability of acoustic tomography arrivals in Fram Strait

Speaker: 
Florian Geyer (Polar Acoustics and Oceanography)
Seminar Date: 
5. March 2019 - 11:15 - 11:45

A regional ocean model for Fram Strait allows to understand the variability and structure of acoustic tomography arrivals. The eddy-permitting model (52 vertical layers and 4.5 km horizontal resolution) was evaluated using long-term moored hydrography data and time series of depth-range averaged temperature obtained from the inversion of acoustic tomography measurements. Geometric ray modelling on the ocean model fields reproduces the measured arrival structure of the acoustic tomography experiment.

Is it really getting younger? Sea ice type and age in model simulations and satellite remote sensing products

Speaker: 
Polona Itkin (Sea Ice Modelling)
Seminar Date: 
16. April 2019 - 11:15 - 11:45

Sea ice type and age are one of the basic indicators of Arctic sea ice state. For a sea ice model to simulate sea ice type or age faithfully, both sea ice dynamics and thermodynamics need to be represented well. In contrast to sea ice thickness, ice age and type have been able to be retrieved from satellite observations relatively reliably for more than a decade. In this study we are using neXtSIM – ‘next generation sea ice model’ that uses Maxwell-elasto-brittle rheology to simulate sea ice motion and a thermodynamical model that accounts for healing of damaged ice through freezing.

Combining Data Assimilation and Machine Learning to emulate a numerical model from noisy and sparse observations

Speaker: 
Julien Brajard (Data Assimilation)
Seminar Date: 
12. February 2019 - 11:15 - 11:45

Is it possible to emulate a numerical model from noisy and sparse observations? How realistic and skillful can it be?

Warmer urban climate in Arctic cities, By: Igor Esau, Victoria Miles and the HIARC project team

Speaker: 
Igor Esau (Climate Dynamics and Prediction)
Seminar Date: 
22. January 2019 - 11:15 - 11:45

The recent IPCC special report on 1.5C warming target has envisioned a number of detrimental effects and environmental challenges that will emerge with the global warming in excess of the target. Our study reveals that majority of the Arctic population is already leaving in the climate conditions significantly warmer than 1.5C and even 3.0C above the mean XXth century regional temperature. These urban temperature anomalies, known to as the urban heat islands (UHIs), may help us to study the effects of the warmer climate in the Arctic region.

Dynamical downscaling of CMIP5 for future projection of the North Pacific Ocean state

Speaker: 
Tsuyoshi Wakamatsu (Ocean Modeling)
Seminar Date: 
6. November 2018 - 11:15 - 11:45

The North Pacific Ocean (NPO) state is about to experience significant transition by the end of this century under the current trend of the global climate change. NPO coastal communities are now facing a challenge to establish adaptation plans to mitigate impacts of the climate change to their socio-economical environment. The best resource to provide the future projection of an ocean state available today is CMIP5 data and they have been used substantially for evaluating future coastal marine environment.

Syntool - a tool for data browsing and visualisation

Speaker: 
Tor I. Olaussen
Seminar Date: 
23. October 2018 - 11:15 - 11:45

The Syntool Arctic Portal, in short, is a satellite remote sensing visualization, comparison tool and data browser. A multitude of remote sensing data products can be imported to individual layers in Syntool. These layers can be turned on and off, making it possible to compare disparate datasets both spatially and temporally.

Measuring Arctic amplification

Speaker: 
Richard Davy
Seminar Date: 
9. October 2018 - 11:15 - 11:45

One of the defining features of both recent and historical cases of global climate change is Arctic Amplification (AA). This is the more rapid change in the surface air temperature (SAT) in the Arctic compared to some wider reference region, such as the Northern Hemisphere (NH) mean. Many different metrics have been developed to quantify the degree of AA based on SAT anomalies, trends and variability. The use of different metrics, as well as the choice of dataset to use can affect conclusions about the magnitude and temporal variability of AA.

Satellite chl-a image inpaintin

Speaker: 
Julien Brajard
Affiliation: 
LOCEAN, Sorbonne Université, NERSC
Seminar Date: 
25. September 2018 - 12:00 - 12:30

In this work, we evaluate the efficiency of a deep-convolutional neural network (CNN) to reconstruct missing data in chlorophyll-a satellite images. The missing area are mainly due to the presence of cloud above the ocean. The CNN-based methodology is compared with a sate-of-art krigging algorithm.

Particle trajectory modelling for improved understanding of the South African shelf sea meso- and submesoscale variability and applications in operational oceanography

Speaker: 
Michael G. Hart-Davis
Affiliation: 
Institute for Coastal and Marine Research, Nelson Mandela University, Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Seminar Date: 
5. July 2018 - 12:30 - 13:30

This seminar will focus on previous work done in collaboration with the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center as well as the planned working being done at NERSC and throughout the M.G. Hart-Davis master thesis.

Study of the Kuroshio intrusion events by the identified paths into the South China Sea using an improved synthetic method

Speaker: 
Dazhi Xu
Affiliation: 
Visiting Scholar from South China Sea Marine Prediction Center, Guangzhou China
Seminar Date: 
28. May 2018 - 13:00 - 13:45

Originating from the North Equatorial Current (NEC), the Kuroshio is the strongest ocean current in the northwest Pacific, which is characterized by high temperature, high salinity, narrow band, and large flow velocity and its variable rate. When passing by the Luzon Strait (LS), a branch of the Kuroshio flows into the South China Sea (SCS) and affects the circulation and temperature-salinity structure in the SCS.

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